A new report by a leading UK-based think tank claims there is enough untapped trade potential to offset the possible effects of Brexit on exports to the European Union (EU).

Open Europe, in its research titled ‘Global Britain: Priorities for trade beyond the EU’, has said that Britain can make up for any export loss as it exits the EU by building on under-developed links with countries like India and making it a priority in its trade negotiations.

“There’s little point making policy looking at just today’s world. According to projections, Germany’s GDP will grow by 14 per cent between 2017 and 2030. Over the same period India’s is expected to more than double. So, we have modelled how the data will appear in 2030, using predicted growth figures,” the report says.

India’s Minister for Finance and Corporate Affairs, Arun Jaitley, just completed a packed tour of the UK during which Prime Minister Theresa May dropped in to a Downing Street meeting with his British counterpart, Chancellor Philip Hammond. ‘India Investment Journal’ caught up with the senior Indian Cabinet minister in London to explore his message for foreign investors, a possible free trade agreement (FTA) with post-Brexit Britain and the next phase of his dramatic reform agenda for the Indian economy.

Is post-Brexit UK a more, or less, attractive trading partner?

There is a considerable amount of interest in India, particularly after Brexit. Correspondingly my discussions in the past have also indicated that both investors and the government here [Britain] are looking for expanding opportunities of trade with India.

Britain beat off tough competition from Japan to hold on to its position as the largest G20 investor and biggest job creator in India, a new report revealed.

Between 2000 and 2016, the UK invested $24.07 billion in India and created 371,000 jobs, the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) finds in its 2017 ‘Sterling Assets India’ report. Japan by comparison invested around $23.76 billion, followed by the US at $19.38 billion as the top G20 investors into India.

India has emerged as one of the world’s fastest growing Scotch whisky import markets. So much so that post-Brexit UK will be looking to connoissuers in India to make up for any drop in sales in Europe as a result of an end to free trade deals within the European Union (EU).

The Scotch Whisky Association (SWA) revealed in its recent analysis that the amount of Scotch whisky sold overseas increased for the first time since 2013, largely thanks to India registering a massive jump in shipment value. It is a confirmation that will come as less of surprise to whisky lovers in India.

India’s relations with the UK are deep and friendly. But the much expected impetus to closer ties will have to wait till clarity emerges on London’s divorce with Brussels.

The rhetoric remains as warm as ever. But as the immediate post-Brexit euphoria about an imminent upsurge in trade ties between India and the United Kingdom is tempered by reality, there is a lack of unanimity in India over the May government’s stand on the New Delhi-London partnership.

Dinesh Patnaik, as the Acting High Commissioner of India to the UK, was the man charged with much of the groundwork that went into Theresa May’s first visit to India as British Prime Minister earlier this month. Here he highlights some of the key outcomes and takeaways from the visit for ‘India Investment Journal’.

Rajesh Agrawal was born in Indore, Madhya Pradesh, and came to London over 15 years ago with only a few hundred pounds in his pocket but a big dream to succeed. He went on to set up multi-million-pound businesses and was recently appointed London’s Deputy Mayor for Business. He tells ‘India Investment Journal’ why London will remain the epicentre of business for India and why he is excited that the UK will collaborate on turning his hometown in MP into a Smart City.

Now that Brexit is done, dusted and fading from the front pages of Indian newspapers, it is time to return to a question that has more immediacy in the domestic context: What after Rexit?

The shrill reactions have subsided. Knee jerk reactions like “After Rexit, ruin,” have, fortunately, proved premature and alarmist. Rexit, of course, borrowing a reference from Brexit or Britain’s exit from the European Union (EU) to reflect Raghuram Rajan’s impending exit as Reserve Bank of India (RBI) governor. Now that the dust is beginning to settle over Rajan’s surprise announcement that he will be returning to academia at the end of his term as India’s central banker, it is a good time for a reality check on how his decision will impact the Indian economy.