Arun Jaitley significantly ramped up India’s ties with Japan in one of his last major foreign visits before handing over the defence portfolio to Cabinet colleague Nirmala Sitharaman.

India’s outgoing defence minister, Arun Jaitley, left no doubts about India’s close ties with its neighbour Japan during a recently concluded tour of the country in early September.

The bilateral Defence Ministerial Meeting in Tokyo saw Jaitley and his Japanese counterpart, Itsunori Onodera, clinch a range of significant tie-ups in the field of defence cooperation, combat exercises and exchanges and counter-terrorism. The significant ramping up of ties is undoubtedly being viewed as a counter-balance to the increasingly volatile situation in the region, with India’s continued tensions with China over Doklam and North Korea’s increasingly belligerent overtures with missile tests.

A country-specific export strategy could turn the tide in India’s favour in the sector, explains an industry expert.

The world apparel trade stood at $445 billion in 2015 down by 8 per cent from previous year. India’s apparel exports grew by 3 per cent in 2015 whereas that of Bangladesh and Vietnam grew by 8 per cent and 16 per cent respectively in the same year. After the phasing out of quotas in 2005, Bangladesh and Vietnam grabbed the opportunity and their apparel exports increased rapidly. Bangladesh surpassed India in apparel exports in 2008 and Vietnam in 2012 as can be seen from the chart below and their apparel exports have been consistently growing and have been higher than India’s exports throughout.

China’s clumsy attempts to cramp India’s strategic space are holding back its ties with India.


The popular mood in India, it will be fair to say, is not very favourable towards China at the moment. A daily barrage of blunt official statements and highly jingoistic media reports from the Middle Kingdom warning India of dire consequences – even war – and reminding Indians of the military humiliation it faced in the 1962 border conflict between the two countries is largely to blame for this downturn in the public perception about China.

A leading solar sector expert analyses the factors behind India’s renewables revolution for ‘India Investment Journal’.

From a miniscule 10MW energy generation capacity in 2010 to 8GW in 2016, is a giant leap that the Indian solar sector has successfully made. Reduction in costs and increased global demand for solar installation have played a major role in giving India a prominent place in global solar sector, but there are a few more components that have contributed to such revolutionary success.

Renewable energy projects led by solar and wind projects have become the key focus of a country quite keen to scale up its power capability rapidly. Here is an analysis of the factors behind this trend in India and its ability to attract the $100bn investment required by 2022.

The renewable energy sector is currently emerging as the only viable driver of the Indian energy industry, despite accounting for only 13.0 per cent (ex hydro) of the country’s 298GW installed power capacity as of FY16. It is largely a result of thermal projects being in the doldrums due to low PLFs, delays in clearances, lack of PPA and fuel shortages.

India Inc. Founder & CEO Manoj Ladwa weighs up the ‘India Opportunity’ and where the China factor fits in today.

Foreign investors can’t help but be charmed by India’s people, especially its aspirational and highly educated youth, are comforted that English is the language of business, and are enticed by the growing purchasing power of its domestic market. But almost universally, when it comes to the inevitable China comparisons, India’s ramshackle infrastructure lets it down..