Rana Kapoor, the CEO of Yes Bank, talks ‘India Investment Journal’ through his company’s recent tie-up with Santander UK, the impact of demonetisation and the gains in store for the banking sector with GST.

What is the thinking behind the tie-up with Santander UK?

The UK-India corridor is a high priority corridor for us. The fact is that India is the fastest growing economy in the world today and quite naturally the opportunities between India and the UK are getting catalysed. Especially, SMEs [small and medium enterprises] need cross-border partners and banks are the channel that can help open new markets for them. Santander and Yes Bank are looking at providing a collaborative platform to help SMEs penetrate new geographies.

India’s ambitious renewable energy targets will help the country pick up some of the slack created by Donald Trump pulling the US out of the Paris climate accord.

Early June, the world was in shock. President Donald Trump of the US announced that he was pulling out of the Paris climate pact. The news wasn’t entirely unexpected, but the US withdrawal still raised question marks about the world’s ability to meet the goal of capping the rise in global temperature to 2 degrees Celsius by the end of end of this century.

Sunil Misra, as Director-General of the Indian Electrical and Electronics Manufacturers Association (IEEMA), has an inside track on the country’s renewables challenge. He speaks to ‘India Investment Journal’ on what gives India an edge in this sector and how the 175GW target for renewable electricity generation by 2022 is on course.

What are the main factors behind a surge in India’s electrical industry sector?

India has seen significant and continued growth in its GDP and per capita income. There has been a substantial increase in in middle class and also aspirations of people, giving rise to consumption.

This enhanced consumption requires strengthening of the Transmission and Distribution network, which the country is undertaking with full vigour through its recent initiatives in coal and renewable sector. The government has also increased its spending on rural electrification in parallel schemes with IPDS (Integrated Power Development Scheme) and DDUGJY (Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Gram Jyoti Yojana), which has further spurred the demand of electrical equipment in India.

China’s clumsy attempts to cramp India’s strategic space are holding back its ties with India.


The popular mood in India, it will be fair to say, is not very favourable towards China at the moment. A daily barrage of blunt official statements and highly jingoistic media reports from the Middle Kingdom warning India of dire consequences – even war – and reminding Indians of the military humiliation it faced in the 1962 border conflict between the two countries is largely to blame for this downturn in the public perception about China.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s programme to make India a major global manufacturing hub is likely to start showing results when the $68-billion of investments committed on the ground start coming on stream over the next couple of years.

Critics complain that the glass is half empty. The Prime Minister’s Make in India initiative has not led to any increase in the share of manufacturing in the country’s GDP and has not generated the huge number of jobs it was expected to.


But that, pardon the pun, is only half the picture. Experts point out that the manufacturing sector begins to contribute to the economy only with a lag of three-four years and point to the pipeline of about $68 billion of foreign investment, much of it in the manufacturing sector, to argue that a better way of describing the glass would be as half full.

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The year 2016 was one of the best years in recent times for initial public offering (‘IPO’) in India owing to stronger macroeconomics, pro-business political regime, continuing regulatory reforms and an overall positive investment climate.

Indian companies raised more than $4bn through IPOs in 2016, which is close to the aggregate equity raised over preceding four years from 2012-15.



The IPO pipeline for 2017 looks promising with some of the large companies expected to tap the equity markets including NSE, SBI Life, UTI Mutual Fund, Railways and Insurance public sector undertaking (PSU). Economic fundamentals are improving and the equity index performance is at a record high. India continues to be one of the top destinations for investments globally.

The Indian healthcare sector is riding the growth curve and emerging as a lucrative site for foreign investments, writes a healthcare analyst.

The Indian healthcare sector is one of the fastest growing sectors with high contribution not only in terms of revenue, but also employment. The Indian healthcare market is expected to rank amongst the top-three healthcare markets in terms of incremental growth by 2020.[1] The sector stood at approximately $113.9 billion in 2016 and is likely to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.6 per cent in the next five years to reach $195.6 billion.

A leading consultant analyses the factors that have made investing in India easier and a more rewarding experience as long as investors go in with a level of preparedness.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has recently altered its predicted growth rate for India slightly downward to 6.8 per cent, but this is still attractive compared to the sluggish rates of growth elsewhere in the world. Foreign investors’ confidence in India has also recently improved, making it the eighth most attractive destination for foreign direct investment (FDI). Meanwhile India’s ranking in the World Bank’s league table for ‘ease of doing business’ is rising, albeit at 130 the improvement isn’t over yet!

These changes have been strongly influenced by the government’s attempts to make India a more attractive market by, for example, implementing demonetisation in November 2016, increasing online transactions and the planned introduction of a common nationwide Goods and Services Tax (GST) in July.

It’s not a target but it remains an aspiration. Given the trajectory of the Indian economy, there’s every reason to be optimistic that this ambitious goal is within reach.

It is not an official target and no one in the government will speak about it on record. But in private, off-the-record conversations, they will admit that receiving $100 billion in annual foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows is an aspiration the Indian government is not giving up on.

That figure isn’t quite a mare’s nest. China consistently crossed that mark during the heady period when it was growing at 9-10 per cent per annum. And, to put things in perspective, India isn’t too far away from that mark.
Achievable ‘target’.

India can learn a lot from South Korea’s ascent from poverty in the 1950s to the ranks of the most technologically advanced societies especially in the fields of manufacturing, defence technology, electronics and skills development. And India can, in turn, help South Korea in areas like software and space technology that it excels in.

It is a warm and deepening economic and strategic partnership that could well become the template for India’s engagement with other geographically smaller but economically dynamic Asian Tigers.

South Korea has been in the news in India recently for three separate but loosely connected developments, all of them positive.