The Indian healthcare sector is riding the growth curve and emerging as a lucrative site for foreign investments, writes a healthcare analyst.

The Indian healthcare sector is one of the fastest growing sectors with high contribution not only in terms of revenue, but also employment. The Indian healthcare market is expected to rank amongst the top-three healthcare markets in terms of incremental growth by 2020.[1] The sector stood at approximately $113.9 billion in 2016 and is likely to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.6 per cent in the next five years to reach $195.6 billion.

India can learn a lot from South Korea’s ascent from poverty in the 1950s to the ranks of the most technologically advanced societies especially in the fields of manufacturing, defence technology, electronics and skills development. And India can, in turn, help South Korea in areas like software and space technology that it excels in.

It is a warm and deepening economic and strategic partnership that could well become the template for India’s engagement with other geographically smaller but economically dynamic Asian Tigers.

South Korea has been in the news in India recently for three separate but loosely connected developments, all of them positive.

A relatively slow-moving solar market in India is showing some signs of promise.

The Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) has announced a 1,000 MW tender in order to allocate rooftop solar projects on government buildings across the country. This is the largest ever rooftop solar tender announced in India till date. Riding on the success of a previous 500 MW rooftop solar tender announced in April 2016, SECI has now doubled the allocation size. This is a welcome move in a market that has historically struggled to take off for a host of reasons. As per official statistics, the rooftop capacity in India stands at 382 MW. This includes only those projects that have been subsidised by the MNRE. The non-subsidised market appears to have crossed 1,000 MW.

The Government of India recently unveiled its vision for India’s steel manufacturing capabilities by circulating a new draft steel policy for 2017 for public discussion and approval by the Cabinet, writes India Inc. policy expert.

India’s new draft ‘National Steel Policy of 2017’ is an outline for attaining a most ambitious target capacity of 300 million tonnes of crude steel capacity by 2030, which is anticipated as the demand for steel by then. India is producing only around a 100 million tonnes today while China, if we must compare, produces around 750/800 million tonnes a year – about 50 per cent of global capacity.

Ramesh Abhishek, Secretary, Department of Investment Policy and Promotion (DIPP), took time out of his punishing schedule to meet ‘India Investment Journal’ to speak about, among other things, how his department is easing rules and re-engineering government processes to make India an easier place to do business in.

Employment intensive sectors such as agriculture, housing, tourism, textiles and retail must flourish and grow, writes a policy expert.

Narendra Modi is known as a transformational leader of exceptional inner strength and courage, and with his announcement a few weeks ago to change high denomination currency notes, he donned an unexpectedly breathtaking challenge on himself and invited every citizen of India to completely and totally metamorphose our economy and society.

India crossed the $300 billion mark at a time when the global economic slowdown has had a dampening impact. This speaks volumes of the opportunity India as an investment destination has to offer and how timely market reforms are creating a positive ecosystem for the international investor.

The government of India has taken up a series of measures to improve Ease of Doing Business in the country. The emphasis has been on simplification and rationalisation of the existing rules and introduction of information technology to make governance more efficient and effective. Today the international investor is all ears to the India story as never before. Almost every decision-making meeting globally has India on its agenda.

The impact of the Indian government’s move to decommission some high value notes from circulation will fully pan out in the New Year.

The 50-day window sought by Prime Minister Narendra Modi for completing the demonetisation of high value Rs 1,000 and Rs 500 notes is now over but the jury is still out on the impact of the move that is, arguably, the most daring, and far reaching, economic reform ever undertaken by any Indian government.

The questions on everybody’s lips are: When will the RBI cut rates? And when will banks pass on RBI’s previous rate cuts to customers?

The logic behind those questions is evident. The short-term economic forecasts are not very encouraging. The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) expects the country’s GDP to grow at 7.1 per cent in 2016-17, a sharp half percentage point lower than its previous growth estimate of 7.6 per cent.

As Managing Director for South Asia and Vice-President, Sales & Marketing Group, of Intel Corporation, Debjani Ghosh is responsible for establishing new growth areas for the US-headquartered tech giant in the region. She works with governments and industry in South Asia to establish policies and initiatives that help accelerate the adoption of technology in the region, especially as an enabler of inclusive growth and development.

Two years into the Digital India, what is the experience of tech collaborators like Intel?

For nearly two decades now, Intel has been committed to digitally transforming India into an empowered society and knowledge economy with a focus on education, skill development and innovation. Now, with the government’s vision for a digital India, we’ve got a higher impetus to drive the next wave of computing among non-urban users, and make an impact at the grassroots level. Our experience shows that public private partnerships and local innovation are two of the key components to achieve the Digital India goals.