India crossed the $300 billion mark at a time when the global economic slowdown has had a dampening impact. This speaks volumes of the opportunity India as an investment destination has to offer and how timely market reforms are creating a positive ecosystem for the international investor.

The government of India has taken up a series of measures to improve Ease of Doing Business in the country. The emphasis has been on simplification and rationalisation of the existing rules and introduction of information technology to make governance more efficient and effective. Today the international investor is all ears to the India story as never before. Almost every decision-making meeting globally has India on its agenda.

As Swedish retail giant IKEA gets set to open up its first India store in Hyderabad this year, ‘India Investment Journal’ catches up with IKEA India’s Deputy Country Manager Patrik Antoni to see how the New Year is likely to pan out for the company.

How do you view 2017 for the company in India?

Very exciting times as we are working towards opening our first India store in Hyderabad by end 2017. Many people in India will soon have access to our home furnishings offer and a unique IKEA shopping experience.

India is a very important market for IKEA. We have been here for 30 years sourcing products for our stores around the world. We are learning a lot from India and we strongly believe that India will influence IKEA globally in a very positive way, both in terms of a retail market and also growing our sourcing landscape with new suppliers, new categories and new materials. We plan to open 25 stores by 2025 in the major Indian cities. So far we have bought land in Hyderabad and Mumbai, we are in parallel looking for sites in the four prioritised cities- Delhi NCR, Bengaluru, Mumbai and Hyderabad.

As Managing Director for South Asia and Vice-President, Sales & Marketing Group, of Intel Corporation, Debjani Ghosh is responsible for establishing new growth areas for the US-headquartered tech giant in the region. She works with governments and industry in South Asia to establish policies and initiatives that help accelerate the adoption of technology in the region, especially as an enabler of inclusive growth and development.

Two years into the Digital India, what is the experience of tech collaborators like Intel?

For nearly two decades now, Intel has been committed to digitally transforming India into an empowered society and knowledge economy with a focus on education, skill development and innovation. Now, with the government’s vision for a digital India, we’ve got a higher impetus to drive the next wave of computing among non-urban users, and make an impact at the grassroots level. Our experience shows that public private partnerships and local innovation are two of the key components to achieve the Digital India goals.

The Government of India recently unveiled its vision for India’s steel manufacturing capabilities by circulating a new draft steel policy for 2017 for public discussion and approval by the Cabinet, writes India Inc. policy expert.

India’s new draft ‘National Steel Policy of 2017’ is an outline for attaining a most ambitious target capacity of 300 million tonnes of crude steel capacity by 2030, which is anticipated as the demand for steel by then. India is producing only around a 100 million tonnes today while China, if we must compare, produces around 750/800 million tonnes a year – about 50 per cent of global capacity.

The Indian healthcare sector is riding the growth curve and emerging as a lucrative site for foreign investments, writes a healthcare analyst.

The Indian healthcare sector is one of the fastest growing sectors with high contribution not only in terms of revenue, but also employment. The Indian healthcare market is expected to rank amongst the top-three healthcare markets in terms of incremental growth by 2020.[1] The sector stood at approximately $113.9 billion in 2016 and is likely to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.6 per cent in the next five years to reach $195.6 billion.

A platform to attract UK’s small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to invest in India is set to transform the economic partnership.

India and the UK traditionally have had strong economic linkages, both on the trade and investment front. According to official statistics from the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion, Government of India, the UK has, until recently, been the third-largest investor in India, just behind Mauritius and Singapore.

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, will be in Delhi, Mumbai and Amritsar at the start of December to stress that companies from Brexit-hit London remain keen to do business with India.

Britain’s decision to leave the European Union (EU) did not echo in London, which voted decisively against Brexit in June 2016. However, faced with the prospect of the British capital losing some of its shine as a gateway to Europe for Indian companies, the Mayor of London has taken matters in his hand.

Limited Liability Partnership: An alternative choice of entity to invest into India

In recent years, Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) into India has been on the rise, with a significant percentage of such FDI originating from Singapore.