Make in India, one of the flagship initiatives launched under Prime Minister Modi, has led to a step change in FDI inflows, writes an investment facilitator.

The total FDI inflows into India stood at $60.1 billion in 2016-17 — the highest ever in a single year. Compared to 2013-14, this represents a 75 per cent increase. India’s achievement is even more stark when compared to falling global FDI flows as highlighted by UNCTAD. More importantly, Make in India has enabled long-term structural changes such as opening new sectors for FDI, increasing the ease of doing business, cutting the red tape and improving the physical infrastructure.

India’s power minister, Piyush Goyal, was on a European investment scouting mission recently and opened up a series of avenues for FDI into the power sector in Vienna and London.

India’s Minister for Power, Coal, New & Renewable Energy and Mines, Piyush Goyal, was on a European tour in early May to lure Austria and the UK to look at investing more in India.



At the Vienna Energy Forum, the discussion revolved around the world’s largest energy transformation programme which is currently being pioneered by India. Goyal asserted that no country can offer the kind of scale and speed that India has in terms of financing and technical capabilities. Goyal also urged the global community to link low-cost technology, renewable energy and sustainable lifestyles.

India’s solar power sector is growing at a fast clip, helped by robust foreign and domestic investor appetite for new projects and the country’s massive 750 GW solar power potential. But it also faces significant challenges from the infirm nature of solar energy and prices falling to levels that may impact financial viability.

India’s steroid-charged solar power capacity addition will take it past Japan as the world’s third largest solar market. India, which crossed 12 GW of solar power capacity in 2016-17, is expected to add about 15 GW more in the current fiscal.

Minister of State for Power, Renewable Energy and Coal told the Rajya Sabha, India’s Upper House of Parliament that the country would add 10,000 MW from largescale solar power projects and 5,000 MW from solar rooftop projects this year.

A relatively slow-moving solar market in India is showing some signs of promise.

The Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) has announced a 1,000 MW tender in order to allocate rooftop solar projects on government buildings across the country. This is the largest ever rooftop solar tender announced in India till date. Riding on the success of a previous 500 MW rooftop solar tender announced in April 2016, SECI has now doubled the allocation size. This is a welcome move in a market that has historically struggled to take off for a host of reasons. As per official statistics, the rooftop capacity in India stands at 382 MW. This includes only those projects that have been subsidised by the MNRE. The non-subsidised market appears to have crossed 1,000 MW.

As India edges towards its ambitious renewable energy target, the next challenge will be effective energy storage solutions that can be made in the country.

India has embarked on an ambitious programme of accelerating renewable energy deployment in the country. The target for renewable energy has been expanded multi-fold to 175 GW by 2022. A major part of the target is going to be from solar PV (100 GW) and wind energy (60 GW) and the rest from small hydro and biomass plants (5 and 10 GW respectively).

A senior public policy expert recaps the progress made in India’s petroleum sector and what more needs to be done for ‘India Investment Journal’.

In the over two years that the Narendra Modi led government has been in power in India, they have shifted the needle of policy on petroleum in the right direction. More needs to be done but…

Though cut from the same cloth, the eldest in the next generation of the Munjal family has taken a divergent route from his predecessors. A staunch advocate of reversing the ill effects of climate change, Rahul Munjal is quickly gaining prominence in the green economy and already has India’s largest rooftop solar installation and first certified commercial green bond to his name. Inspired by his father who founded what was to become world’s largest two wheeler maker–Hero MotoCorp, the junior Munjal is hoping his venture would be as successful in its own way.

On October 23, 2014, Pawan Munjal, the chairman and CEO of Hero MotoCorp world’s largest two wheeler manufacturer was busy showcasing the company’s new factory in Neemrana to a select group of media persons. The facility with a capacity to make 7.5 lakh units every year was Hero’s fourth in the country and one of the most modern and sophisticated two wheeler manufacturing facilities. Due to be inaugurated the following day, Munjal was at pains to explain how this factory was unlike any other. Before the journalists could be taken to the shop floor—the heart of any automotive facility where the assembly of vehicles takes place—Munjal escorted all of them to the roof of the building.

Renewable energy projects led by solar and wind projects have become the key focus of a country quite keen to scale up its power capability rapidly. Here is an analysis of the factors behind this trend in India and its ability to attract the $100bn investment required by 2022.

The renewable energy sector is currently emerging as the only viable driver of the Indian energy industry, despite accounting for only 13.0 per cent (ex hydro) of the country’s 298GW installed power capacity as of FY16. It is largely a result of thermal projects being in the doldrums due to low PLFs, delays in clearances, lack of PPA and fuel shortages.

The Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW) experts navigate India’s $100bn renewables challenge to present a view on a much-needed boom in this crucial sector.

India’s solar power capacity has grown nearly 400 times in six years, from a mere 17.8MW in March 2010 to nearly 6,998MW in April 2016. However, the real solar boom is yet to come, as India strives to realise its ambitious target of 100GW of installed solar PV capacity by 2022.