Arun Jaitley significantly ramped up India’s ties with Japan in one of his last major foreign visits before handing over the defence portfolio to Cabinet colleague Nirmala Sitharaman.

India’s outgoing defence minister, Arun Jaitley, left no doubts about India’s close ties with its neighbour Japan during a recently concluded tour of the country in early September.

The bilateral Defence Ministerial Meeting in Tokyo saw Jaitley and his Japanese counterpart, Itsunori Onodera, clinch a range of significant tie-ups in the field of defence cooperation, combat exercises and exchanges and counter-terrorism. The significant ramping up of ties is undoubtedly being viewed as a counter-balance to the increasingly volatile situation in the region, with India’s continued tensions with China over Doklam and North Korea’s increasingly belligerent overtures with missile tests.

The UK-based Global Innovation Fund, which invests in innovations targeted at improving the lives of the poorest people in developing countries, has pumped in millions to back an Indian farm mechanisation project.

EM3 AgriServices, India’s leading private sector farm mechanisation services company, has raised a $10 million Series B round from London-based Global Innovation Fund (GIF) and existing investor Aspada. The company had earlier raised a $3.3 million Series A from Aspada in June 2015.

Re-skilling and up-skilling must go hand-in-hand with tech advances in India, writes a digital expert.

Last month, the lead singer of 70s band Talking Heads, David Byrne, wrote in the ‘MIT Technology Review’ about how tech is eliminating humans. With AI, autonomous vehicles, robots, automated self-service check-outs, and lots more, he says the art of human interaction will die away, since there will be no humans doing the traditional jobs of serving customers. But what does that mean for India, where there are over a billion people: if tech will replace all the manual jobs that give people a daily living, what will they do?

Innovative technology in real-life use is transforming India’s IT landscape, writes a tech expert.

When I was growing up in the 1970s, electronics was just something fun – my electronics kit that my parents bought me allowed me to make simple circuits that could switch on a bulb as soon as it went dark, or create metronomes or other seemingly non-useful things. However, now, electronics and technology underpins everything, and for me the fun that I had as a child has become useful in the world around us.

Rolls-Royce started its relationship with India over 80 years ago with its engines powering the first civil and military aircraft in the country. Chris Cholerton, President – Defence Aerospace at one of the world’s leading manufacturers in the sector, tells ‘India Investment Journal’ how a focus on technology and capability transfer has contributed towards India’s sustainable growth.

How is Rolls-Royce supporting the India growth story?

Today, as an investor, a high skills employer and a supplier of power systems across aerospace, marine, nuclear and industrial, we are developing a significant portfolio of activity in India to undertake progressively more complex activity across the engineering, manufacturing and supply chain domain. We believe in India’s inherent strengths and are well-positioned to support the government in its commitment to ‘Make in India’ and in other socio-economic initiatives such as ‘Smart Cities’ ‘Skilling’ etc.

It was billed as a clear signal of a very special relationship that Theresa May had chosen India as her first major bilateral visit outside Europe since taking charge as British Prime Minister. However, if she thought that trade and investment talks can be divorced from concerns over the UK’s ever tightening visa regime, she was in for a surprise.